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Gay and bi guys are at highest risk of HIV.

It comes down to basic biology and simple maths. Click to reveal the three key reasons why 80% of HIV in New Zealand is among gay and bi guys.

It’s much easier to get HIV from anal sex.

It’s been scientifically proven that anal sex is eighteen times riskier than vaginal sex. There are two reasons for this. First, the cells in the ass are much more susceptible to HIV than cells in the vagina. Second, both semen and rectal mucosa (the lining of the ass) carry more HIV than vaginal fluid. Combine this with the fact that gay and bi guys have much more anal sex than straight guys, and you’ve got yourself a lot more risk right there.

There’s already a lot of gay and bi Kiwis who have HIV

In a recent Auckland study, 1 in 15 gay and bi guys were found to have HIV. So, if you’re a guy hooking up with other guys, you’re more likely to meet someone who has HIV (and according to that same study, there’s a 20 percent chance that person with HIV doesn’t know it yet).

We’re more closely connected than you might think

The reality is that there are less gay and bi guys than there are straight men and women. So when you’re meeting a guy for casual sex, the pool of people you have to choose from is smaller. This makes gay and bi guys much more closely connected, sexually, than the rest of the population. It also allows HIV and other STIs to spread quickly among us.

Don’t let fear affect your health.

The truth is, HIV is most dangerous when you don’t know it’s there. If you find out you’re positive, accessing HIV treatment is both a smart move for your health and for drastically reducing the risk of passing on HIV.

Knowing that you have HIV puts you in control.

If left undiagnosed and untreated, HIV causes serious damage to your immune system. The good news is, once you start treatment you’re back in control. Treatment greatly reduces HIV replication and helps strengthen your immune system.

Being on treatment reduces the risk of passing on HIV.

New research shows that starting treatment as soon as possible can make it easier for HIV-positive people to get an undetectable viral load. This makes HIV much harder to pass on to sexual partners.

Don’t let fear affect your health.

The truth is, HIV is most dangerous when you don’t know it’s there. If you find out you’re positive, accessing HIV treatment is both a smart move for your health and for drastically reducing the risk of passing on HIV.

Knowing that you have HIV puts you in control.

If left undiagnosed and untreated, HIV causes serious damage to your immune system. The good news is, once you start treatment you’re back in control. Treatment greatly reduces HIV replication and helps strengthen your immune system.

Being on treatment reduces the risk of passing on HIV.

New research shows that starting treatment as soon as possible can make it easier for HIV-positive people to get an undetectable viral load. This makes HIV much harder to pass on to sexual partners.

Don’t let fear affect your health.

The truth is, HIV is most dangerous when you don’t know it’s there. If you find out you’re positive, accessing HIV treatment is both a smart move for your health and for drastically reducing the risk of passing on HIV.

Knowing that you have HIV puts you in control.

If left undiagnosed and untreated, HIV causes serious damage to your immune system. The good news is, once you start treatment you’re back in control. Treatment greatly reduces HIV replication and helps strengthen your immune system.

Being on treatment reduces the risk of passing on HIV.

New research shows that starting treatment as soon as possible can make it easier for HIV-positive people to get an undetectable viral load. This makes HIV much harder to pass on to sexual partners.

Gay and bi guys are at highest risk of HIV.

It comes down to basic biology and simple maths. Click to reveal the three key reasons why 80% of HIV in New Zealand is among gay and bi guys.

It’s much easier to get HIV from anal sex.

It’s been scientifically proven that anal sex is eighteen times riskier than vaginal sex. There are two reasons for this. First, the cells in the ass are much more susceptible to HIV than cells in the vagina. Second, both semen and rectal mucosa (the lining of the ass) carry more HIV than vaginal fluid. Combine this with the fact that gay and bi guys have much more anal sex than straight guys, and you’ve got yourself a lot more risk right there.

There’s already a lot of gay and bi Kiwis who have HIV

In a recent Auckland study, 1 in 15 gay and bi guys were found to have HIV. So, if you’re a guy hooking up with other guys, you’re more likely to meet someone who has HIV (and according to that same study, there’s a 20 percent chance that person with HIV doesn’t know it yet).

We’re more closely connected than you might think

The reality is that there are less gay and bi guys than there are straight men and women. So when you’re meeting a guy for casual sex, the pool of people you have to choose from is smaller. This makes gay and bi guys much more closely connected, sexually, than the rest of the population. It also allows HIV and other STIs to spread quickly among us.

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A few quick questions so we can recommend the best service to meet your needs:


* What is your gender identity?

* Who do you have sex with?

* Where would you like to get tested?
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