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The Department of Internal Affairs

The Department of Internal Affairs

Te Tari Taiwhenua

Building a safe, prosperous and respected nation

 

Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord

The Kia Tutahi logo

Key Information

The Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord was signed in 2011 and is an important symbol of commitment between the government and communities to engage effectively to achieve social, economic, cultural and environmental outcomes. It sets expectations about how government agencies and communities will work together. 

The Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord is also available in nine languages besides English.

Where we're going

As the agency coordinating work to give effect to the Accord, the Department of Internal Affairs continues to work with communities and other government agencies to champion the Accord, and to promote emerging good practice.

Review of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord 2015

The Department of Internal Affairs has completed a review of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord, which sought to understand community and government agency perspectives on what has worked well so far, and identify opportunities to further improve engagement practices and relationships.

The review included two surveys, which assessed feedback from community organisations and feedback from government agencies. The survey to community organisations was developed in partnership with Hui E!

The survey of communities found that 60% had experienced examples of good engagement. However, only 20% were aware of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord.

What worked best were:

  • face to face and personal communications;
  • supportive advice, information and help;
  • clinics, workshops and seminars; and
  • collaboration and partnership.

What could be improved included:

  • listening more; collaboration;
  • discussion and more meaningful engagement;
  • simpler forms and online services; and
  • clearer signposts to “the right person”.

For more information, see our one page summary and the full document.

For government agencies, 80% felt their engagement with the community was built on trust and mutual respect, good faith and inclusiveness. More than 60% of respondents did not know or were not aware of any resources to assist with community engagement.

What worked well were: collective responsibility, acting in good faith, and work built on trust and mutual respect.

The top challenges were: limited resources; inconsistent messages; and meeting deadlines.

The full report

Read the full report below:

One page summary

View a one page summary of the report:

The one page summary contains the following information:

Community findings:

  • 25,496 survey by Hui E!
  • 991 (3.9%) responded
  • 600 (60%) had experienced examples of good engagement
  • 200 (20%) were aware of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord
  • Department of Internal Affairs: "The DIA partnership with our Project has worked very well. The DIA rep who works with us has done a superb job of supporting us and guiding us over various hurdles."
  • Ministry of Social Development: "MDS capability building

     

    engagement was good."
  • City and District Councils (various): "The Council proposed many items in the LTP consultation process and provided many public meetings, on-line information and documents were available throughout the district."
  • Ministry of Health: "The Ministry of Health recently made a concerted effort to ensure good representation of NGOs at workshops on the review of the NZ Health Strategy."
  • Department of Conservation: "We have a strong working relationship with DOC."

Where in New Zealand?

  • Auckland
  • Hamilton
  • Tauranga
  • Hawke's Bay
  • Wellington
  • Nelson
  • Christchurch
  • Dunedin
  • Invercargill

What worked best?

  • Supportive advice, information and help
  • Communication: face to face and personal
  • Collaboration and partnership
  • Clinics, workshops and seminars

What can we do better?

  • Listen more
  • Collaboration, discussion and more meaningful engagement
  • Simplify forms and online services
  • Signpost us to "the right person"

Government findings:

  • 35 responses from 16 agencies (via SurveyMonkey)
  • 80% felt their engagement with the community was built on trust and mutual respect, good faith and inclusiveness

What worked well?

  • Collective responsibility
  • Acting in good faith
  • Work built on trust and mutual respect

What were the key challenges?

  • Limited resources
  • Inconsistent messages
  • Meeting deadlines
  • Over 60% of respondents did not know or were not aware of any resources to assist with community engagement

Open Government Partnership 

The Open Government Partnership (OGP) is an international forum where countries work together to ensure that member governments are more open, accountable and responsive to citizens. As part of New Zealand’s commitment to joining the OGP in 2014, an Action Plan of how the Government will implement the OGP principles includes the 2015 review of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Acord. Further information on the OGP is available on the State Services Commission’s website: http://www.ssc.govt.nz/open-government-partnership

 

Where we've been

Lunchtime seminars

Seminars to promote the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord were hosted by the Department of Internal Affairs in 2013 and 2014. The seminars were held during lunchtime in Wellington. Presentations at the lunchtime seminars were delivered by Inspiring Communities; the New Zealand Rugby League Association; Platform Trust; Charities Services of the Department of Internal Affairs; the Ministry of Education; the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment; and the Ministry of Social Development.

Championing agencies

There are six champion agencies within government that developed case studies in 2011 that, demonstrate the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord's principles in action.  These included:

  • The Department of Internal Affairs
  • Ministry of Health
  • Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs
  • Ministry of Social Development
  • Sport New Zealand
  • Te Puni Kōkiri

Kia Tutahi Case Stories

The Department of Internal Affairs collected 16 case stories in 2011 that promoted the principles of the Accord in practice. Since then, seven of these case stories have been completed. Case stories provide a means for highlighting and extracting practical examples and methods for improving community-government engagement practices. The Department will continue to collect case stories as part of its commitment to championing the Accord.

Development of Kia Tūtahi in 2010-2011

A steering group was appointed by the Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector in 2010 to oversee the development the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord. The group were selected on the basis of having the skills, experience and networks to reach a diverse range of individuals and organisations.

At Parliament on 1 August 2011, the Prime Minister and Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector hosted a signing ceremony. The Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord was signed by the Government and community representatives.

Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key and former Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Tariana Turia sign the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord

Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key and former Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Tariana Turia sign the Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord

Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key and former Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Tariana Turia prior to the signing of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship accord.

Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key and former Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Tariana Turia prior to the signing of the Kia Tūtahi Relationship accord.

 The Kia Tūtahi Relationship Accord in languages other than English

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