National Library of New Zealand
Harvested by the National Library of New Zealand on: Aug 24 2011 at 10:17:16 GMT
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  • A camera without a lens is like macaroni without cheese, a ship without sails, Simon without Garfunkel... you get the point. Your lens is an important, multitasking gadget, allowing you full control over a variety of aspects to your shot. Aperture, focus, and focal length are all dictated by this handy device. But don't take our word for it! Camera guru, Vincent LaForet is here with Blake to show us the basics on what lenses do and how to pick one that is best for your project. Check out the video below!


    Aperture
    The aperture is the diameter of the lens opening. The larger the diameter of the aperture, the more light reaches the film or image sensor. The aperture also performs a critical function for focus. As the aperture decreases in size, the background and foreground gain sharpness. This zone of sharpness is called the depth of field. Continue Reading…
    Category:
    DSLR
    , Gear
    , Shooting
    Difficulty:
    Beginner
  • Focal length is an important aspect to keep in mind when you're deciding which lens to use to shoot your video. Different focal lengths will affect how your subjects appear in the shot and can even sway a viewer's opinion of your subjects. Watch the video to see how!



    When you use different lenses, you'll notice that even if you don't move the camera, the subjects in that image get larger or smaller. The longer the lens, the more compressed your image gets meaning things in the background will appear much larger than if you were using a wide-angle lens.
    • Wide angle lens - 16mm emphasizes the foreground and de-emphasizes the background. Be careful of image distortion while using this lens.
    • Standard lens - 50mm shows the foreground and background subjects as just about the same sizes.
    • Telephoto lens - 200mm has very little depth of field and highly compresses your image.
    Continue Reading…
    Category:
    DSLR
    , Gear
    , Shooting
    Difficulty:
    Beginner
  • Depth of Field refers to the part of the image that is in focus. A deep DOF allows both the foreground and background to appear in focus, while a shallow DOF will only allow focus on a single area or subject. Let's see what Vincent and Blake have to say about it in the video below!


    F-stop
    Describes the size of the aperture opening. The lower the f-stop number, the bigger the aperture and the more light is able to reach the image sensor.
    A low f-stop (large aperture) results in a shallow DOF. A high f-stop (smaller aperture) gives a deep DOF. To dive into this further, take a look at our lesson on f-stop and aperture here.

    Shallow vs. Deep
    Shallow depth of field means that a subject is in focus but objects in front and behind it appear out of focus. Less DOF is often desired when shooting portrait, close-up and macro shots. Continue Reading…
    Category:
    DSLR
    , Gear
    , Shooting
    Difficulty:
    Beginner
  • Battery Basics
    Batteries power almost all our gadgets nowadays, and cameras are no exception. When it comes to production, it can be difficult keeping track of all the different battery options, but with a little research, you can find the best solution for your equipment.

    In preparation for this lesson, we made this video. Unfortunately we had some technical difficulties-

    00:00
    40

    No big deal though! It's a fairly straightforward topic so let's dig in!

    Certain cameras still use non-rechargeable alkaline based batteries. While these batteries are generally cheaper, they don't last nearly as long and are only good for one time use. Fortunately, most modern cameras use rechargeable batteries.

    Let's look at the two most common types of rechargeable batteries used in cameras. There's nickel metal hydride (NiMH), and lithium ion. Lithium ion is the preferred type for use in high end equipment as NiMH batteries tend to discharge when not in use and do not provide as much power overall. Because of this, most cameras are designed to use lithium ion batteries which are proprietary (meaning they are made for use in those specific cameras). Some lower end cameras use AA or AAA (NiMH) batteries since they're cheaper. Continue Reading…
    Category:
    Gear
    , Shooting
    Difficulty:
    Beginner

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