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Ngā Tapuwae September 2010

Message from Greg

Greg Goulding.
Welcome to Ngā Tapuwae, the newsletter that gives you an insight of what we have been up to at Archives New Zealand.
 
On September 14, Department of Internal Affairs Chief Executive Brendan Boyle released the document outlining his preferred design for the new integrated department, including Internal Affairs, Archives New Zealand and the National Library of New Zealand.

 
Brendan Boyle attended a meeting of staff in the Archives New Zealand's Wellington office on Monday 27 September. Brendan gave a short overview of what the design aimed to do, before touching on the importance of the Deputy Chief Executives in the new organisation. He also answered a number of questions posed to him by staff.
 
The design places Archives New Zealand in the newly created Knowledge, Information and Technology business group along with the National Library, Government Information Services and an all-of-government ICT office.
 
Placement in this Group connects us strongly with government’s technology and information infrastructure. As the agency responsible for the recorded information of government, I believe there are real benefits that can be achieved through this connection.
 
This new function is central to the new Department of Internal Affairs as a government leader of knowledge and information in the years to come.
 
Significantly the independent role of the Chief Archivist is maintained in the proposed structure with a direct reporting line to the Minister responsible for the Department of Internal Affairs.
 
Feedback on the proposals is welcomed. This can be done as individuals or in groups and is due by 5pm on 4 October 2010.
 
The consultation document is available on the Internal Affairs Integration website (http://www.integration.dia.govt.nz/integration.nsf).
 
The other major item for many of us this month was the Canterbury earthquake of 4 September. Archives New Zealand’s Christchurch Regional Office was closed to the public for about two weeks, while inspections were carried out to ensure areas, including the archival storage spaces, were safe for our staff to work in.
 
The office reopened to the public on Wednesday 22 September, and our staff have reported a steady stream of customers, ready to use our Reading Room services once again.
 
Archives New Zealand has been invited to showcase the Digital Continuity Action Plan at an international gathering of senior public sector officials in Malaysia in October. The attendance at the FutureGov 2010 summit is being funded by the summit organisers. The invitation reinforces the keen interest in what Archives New Zealand is doing by the information and recordkeeping sectors worldwide.
 
On the homefront, we report on the latest findings of the Government Recordkeeping Survey 2010, which allows us to see the positive impact the Public Records Act 2005 has had on public sector recordkeeping habits. The data from the survey highlights an important baseline for identifying current recordkeeping issues and concerns across government.
 
We catch up with the Government Recordkeeping team who have been involved in a flurry of activity, including reviewing the Electronic Recordkeeping Systems Standard (ERKSS) and running a Strategic Information Management forum in Wellington. In addition to which they have completed a Customer Satisfaction Survey to ensure the continuous improvement of services.
 
One of the pleasing results of this survey were that overall 83 percent of customers were satisfied with the quality of our services, and 50 percent were very satisfied; 70 percent said that they received better service than they had expected.
 
Archives New Zealand staff have been involved in a number of conferences over the past two months including RMAA, ARANZ and ALGIM
 
If you are in Wellington you might be interested in taking a look at the war diaries of Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone, and the letters he wrote home which are among the Alexander Turnbull Library collections currently accessible at Archives New Zealand’s National Office, 10 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon.
 
The Context Control team of five archivists are profiled in this issue, where they talk about their behind-the-scenes work to make our holdings more accessible to the wider community.
 
Have a great read.
 

Greg Goulding
Acting Chief Executive, Archives New Zealand
 

DCAP up for international award

Archives New Zealand’s Digital Continuity Action Plan (DCAP) has been nominated in several categories of an international award for innovation in public sector information management.
 
The invitation to take part in the FutureGov 2010 awards and showcase DCAP at a summit of senior government officials in Malaysia, next month, reinforces the high level of international interest in Archives New Zealand’s archiving and recordkeeping initiatives and achievements.
 
John Roberts, Archives New Zealand’s Acting Group Manager Government Recordkeeping, will present the Plan at the FutureGov 2010 Summit in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia on 15 October.
 
The three-day executive summit will be attended by an invited audience of senior government officials from the Asia Pacific region, as well as guest speakers from North America and Europe.
 
For more information go to www.futuregov.net 
 
 

DCAP survey coming soon

A survey designed to gather information about at-risk areas of digital public sector information is being undertaken by Archives New Zealand this October.

Archives New Zealand Digital Continuity Senior Adviser, Monica Greenan says, “The survey is part of a body of analytical work which will form the basis for a staged approach to whole of public sector digital continuity. It will enable us to build up risk profiles and prioritise and target activity.”

The survey will be issued to all public sector Chief Information Officers on 11 October.

Respondents will be asked to consider a set of risks, assess whether or not these risks are likely to occur in their own organisations either at present or in the next five years and then determine the likely impact of such an occurrence.
 
 

New archives ordering system goes national

Archives New Zealand’s new ordering system has been successfully launched in all four of the department's offices (Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin). Customers may now order records to view in the reading rooms directly from the department’s online search engine, Archway.
 
Project Manager Mike Heron says, “this is a great step forward for Archives New Zealand. It has improved our system for tracking archives and we can now find the location of an archive in our holdings at the touch of a button.”
 
He adds, “the biggest benefit for readers is that they can now order archives from home before coming in to view them in one of our reading rooms.
 
“After registering for the first time customers are automatically registered for all four of our offices. We have had some great feedback from customers about how easy it is to place orders now.’’
 
The ordering system is supported by the Archives Location Finder (ALF), the new archives management system used by staff.
 
Christchurch's Acting Regional Archivist Rosie Ballantyne with reader.  Wellington-based Archivist Sarah McClintock (right photo) register readers under the new system.
Above: Christchurch's Acting Regional Archivist Rosie Ballantyne (left photo), and Wellington-based Archivist Sarah McClintock (right photo) register readers under the new system.
 

An update from the Government Recordkeeping Programme

The Government Recordkeeping team have been a busy bunch lately. In between reviewing the Electronic Recordkeeping Systems Standard (ERKSS) and running a Strategic Information Management forum in Wellington, they have completed a Customer Satisfaction Survey to ensure the continuous improvement of services.
 
Government Recordkeeping Advisor, Anna Gulbransen says, “we have been working on a project to replace the ERKSS with a ‘best practice’ international standard.”
 
Originally designed to specify the minimum requirements of electronic recordkeeping systems within the New Zealand context, the standard has been identified as a priority for review because of the rapidly changing nature of the electronic software market.
 
Anna said, “the new Digital Recordkeeping Standard includes information on how the international standard works in New Zealand. The new standard has been signed off by Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding, and is awaiting publication.
 
Project Manager, Lisa Judge holds the draft cover of the new Digital Recordkeeping Standard.
Above: Project Manager, Lisa Judge holds the draft cover of the new Digital Recordkeeping Standard.
 
Anna said, “We have also hosted our third Wellington forum of this year, Strategic Information Management: adding value to the achievement of organisational goals.
 
“Keynote speakers included: Archives New Zealand Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding, who talked on Recordkeeping through change – a strategic approach; Department of Conservation Chief Information Officer (CIO), Trudy Rankin gave The CIO perspective; and Desiree Brown, Manager Enterprise Content, Ministry of Social Development talked about Making a Difference, the difference between records management and strategic information management.
 
“There was also a panel discussion on how strategic information management works in practice, and an update on current developments at Archives New Zealand,” she said.
 
The Government Recordkeeping team joined forces with Archives New Zealand’s’ Access Services in a Customer Satisfaction Survey.
 
Anna said, “this was the first time the survey has been done by Archives New Zealand, and we have decided to hold it annually to ensure continuous improvement of services.
 
“The survey allows us to compare what people value and what we deliver.

Overall 83 percent of customers were satisfied with the quality of our services, and 50 percent were very satisfied; 70 percent said that they received better service than they had expected.
 
“We have plans to implement changes based on the feedback received in order to provide the best possible service to our customers,” said Anna.
 

Archives New Zealand partnership enables worldwide access to shipping lists

New Zealanders researching their family history will have access to 3,000,000 maritime immigration records from the 1800s to 1970s, thanks to a joint venture between Archives New Zealand and FamilySearch.
 
Some 3000 pages of passenger and crew lists noting who arrived at which New Zealand port and on what date, have been digitised at Archives New Zealand and are being uploaded to genealogy website FamilySearch.org.
 
The project has been a worldwide effort with Archives New Zealand’s partner on the project FamilySearch based in Utah, USA. Archives New Zealand Auckland Regional Archivist Mark Stoddard was the project manager who together with staff from Access Services helped bring the project to life.
 
FamilySearch volunteers Bill and Glenys Chadderton from Te Awamutu worked in the Archives New Zealand Wellington office’s digital laboratory photographing the shipping lists. Work began in September 2008 and continued for well over a year.
 
Archives New Zealand Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding says, “this project means that both New Zealanders and a world-wide audience will be able to go on-line in the comfort of their homes, and research their family history.
 
“The shipping lists enable New Zealanders to discover where their family members came from, how old they where when they arrived, and other facts about their lives such as their professions.”
 
FamilySearch were very positive about their experience of working with Archives New Zealand.
 
Michael Higgins, Pacific Area representative for FamilySearch says,” the Archives have been great to work with and we feel privileged to be involved.”
 
Records from the shipping lists from 1871 through to 1915 are now available on FamilySearch.org, with more to follow over the next few months.

 

Public recordkeeping on the right track

The news about public sector recordkeeping habits is positive, according to a recent survey carried out by Archives New Zealand.

In the key findings from the Government Recordkeeping Survey of public offices in 2010, 93 percent of public offices reported they have a formal recordkeeping programme in place or are working towards implementing one.

Seventy-one percent of public offices reported they have a disposal authority covering records of their core functions, or are currently developing one.

The survey also identified challenges for the coming year, including:
Fifty-nine percent of public offices reported they have at least some records in a format they cannot access; and 17 percent said they had a migration plan in place for electronic records.

Ninety-three percent of public offices responded to the survey. The results from the survey enable Archives New Zealand to support the recordkeeping requirements of public offices.

The data from the survey helps provide an important baseline for identifying current recordkeeping issues and concerns across government. Results will also contribute to the Chief Archivist’s annual report on the state of government recordkeeping to the Minister responsible for Archives New Zealand.

A report on this year’s survey findings will shortly be available on Archives New Zealand’s website.

Public offices can email the Government Recordkeeping Programme to discuss their results rkadvice@archives.govt.nz

A separate survey into local government recordkeeping practices drew a response from 60 percent of local authorities.

Key findings were:
92 percent of respondents reported they have a formal recordkeeping programme in place or are working towards implementing one
82 percent reported they use electronic recordkeeping systems, or are currently undertaking a project to implement a system to manage electronic records

The survey revealed some challenges for the coming year, including:
55 percent of respondents reported they have records in a format they can no longer access; and only 29 percent said they have an access policy in place for their records.
 

Christchurch office staff praised for hard work after the earthquake

Archives New Zealand’s Christchurch Regional Office reopened to the public on Wednesday 22 September after Christchurch staff worked tirelessly to restore order to the office following the earthquake of 4 September.
 
  Acting Regional Archivist Rosie Ballantyne, Archives Support Assistant/Preservation Technician Vicki Hawes, and Archivist Katherine Doig at the reopening of Archives' Christchurch regional office.
Above (left to right): Acting Regional Archivist Rosie Ballantyne, Archives Support Assistant/Preservation Technician Vicki Hawes, and Archivist Katherine Doig at the reopening of Archives' Christchurch regional office.
 
As well as putting their office in order the Christchurch staff also received numerous accolades and heart-felt thanks from colleagues at the Department of Internal Affairs who were welcomed into the Archives’ building after the earthquake.
 
Christchurch Acting Regional Archivist Rosie Ballantyne said, “the DIA office in the central business district was closed after the earthquake. As a result, we hosted staff from their Wellington and Auckland offices who covered general Identity Services for their Christchurch office.”
 
Internal Affairs Chief Executive Brendan Boyle showered praise on the Christchurch team, “my sincere thanks to all of you in Christchurch for your fantastic response at a time when you were under stress yourselves and for the work you have done to clear-up the office to ensure the archives are restored to reasonable condition as soon as practical.”
 
The Archives building had been given the all-clear by structural engineers shortly after the September 4 earthquake, but it remained closed to the public while an inspection was carried out on damaged shelving in the stacks, to ensure the area was safe to work in.
 
Archives New Zealand Acting Chief Executive, Greg Goulding admired Christchurch staff for dealing with the aftermath of the earthquake so well, “I have been to see the team and appreciate while they have been through a great deal themselves they were able to turn this terrible event into a real positive for others.”
 
Below left: Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding at the Christchurch regional office.
 Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding at the Christchurch regional office.   The impact the Canterbury earthquake had on Archives' Christchurch office.
Above right: The impact the Canterbury earthquake had on Archives' Christchurch office.
 
“The earthquake is a timely reminder of the need to have disaster recovery plans in place to ensure where possible damage to archives and records is minimised. Staff in preservation, community archives and government recordkeeping have been working behind the scenes to ensure we have given people timely advice and information.”
 
Archives New Zealand’s website has information on disaster recovery of archives and records and this has been linked to the www.canterburyearthquake.govt.nz website managed by DIA.
 

Conference roundup

We take a look at some recent conferences and meetings at which Archives New Zealand presented on key projects and pieces of work relevant to public sector recordkeeping and information management.
 
 
ALGIM
Recordkeeping In A Time Of Constant Change
was the theme of a keynote presentation by Greg Goulding, Acting Chief Archivist and CEO, Archives New Zealand at the annual ALGIM Records Management Symposium held in Wellington.
 
This annual gathering of information and archives managers and teams in the public sector heard from Archives New Zealand staff about key areas of work, including digital recordkeeping and information practices, and new recordkeeping standards.
 
Other highlights included several real world case studies and workshops on ALGIM’s self-assessment and classification modules from the Information Management Toolkit.

Presentations made at the ALGIM symposium are available on the association’s website. View and access the 2010 Records Management Symposium presentations.
 

ARANZ Conference
Professor Randall C. Jimerson of Western Washington University, USA delivered the keynote address at this year’s annual conference of the Archives and Records Association of New Zealand (ARANZ) in Wellington last month.

 
Greg (centre), ARANZ key speaker Randall C Jimerson, Western Washington University (left) and US Ambassador David Huebner.
Above: Greg (centre), ARANZ key speaker Randall C Jimerson, Western Washington University (left) and US Ambassador David Huebner.

With the theme The Archive is Politics: Neutrality is not an Option, he told participants of the importance of archives in keeping those in power accountable. He gave examples such as The Heiner Affair in Australia, which saw archivists and records managers coerced into illegal destruction of records. He also challenged archivists to consider the fact that they may, in their decision-making about what to collect or not collect, influence the remembering or forgetting of our past.
 
The conference theme: Investing in the Future 2010: Research, Records and Preservation gave great scope to the Archives New Zealand staff whose presentations kept delegates up to date with the work of the department: including recordkeeping strategies, storage capacity, film preservation and digital continuity.

The Government Digital Archive was in the spotlight at the conference, with Archives New Zealand’s Acting Recordkeeping Group Manager John Roberts joining forces with National Library’s Stephen Knolls to highlight the programme in the closing plenary session at the ARANZ conference.
 
Below left: Appraisal Adviser Lisa Austin, Archivist Stefanie Lash, and Archives Support Assistant Norman Gough at the conference.
Appraisal Adviser Lisa Austin, Archivist Stefanie Lash, and Archives Support Assistant Norman Gough at the conference.  Stuart Strachen (Archives Council), Digital Continuity Programme Manager, Evelyn Wareham and Policy and Planning Senior Adviser, Jeremy Cauchi.
Above right: Stuart Strachen (Archives Council), Digital Continuity Programme Manager, Evelyn Wareham and Policy and Planning Senior Adviser, Jeremy Cauchi.
 
The session entitled Investing in our digital future – highlighting government digital archives programme covered the challenges of developing the archive that will store our public records, John Roberts said.
 
“Archives New Zealand is building on common ground with the National Library and what we need to do ourselves. This involves developing our understanding of the tools, applications and infrastructure of the digital archive and what we can share and extend and what needs to be addressed."
 
In May Government allocated $12.6 million in Budget money to Archives New Zealand and the National Library over the next four years to develop and implement a full-scale industrial digital archive.
 
The new archive will allow Archives New Zealand to take in transfers of a wide range of government agency digital records, such as, email messages, videos, databases and electronic documents. These records will be actively preserve and maintain so they remain accessible to agencies and the public into the future.
 

RMAA Convention and workshop
The intricacies of New Zealand’s public sector audit programme and how to develop a Digital Continuity Action Plan were shared with delegates at this year’s RMAA Convention in Australia this month.
 
Archives New Zealand’s Acting Group Manager Government Recordkeeping Group, John Roberts presented a paper on the Audit Programme, outlining the positioning of the audit programme and the value of the programme to public sector offices and government as a whole.
 
“The audit process has significant benefits to agencies enabling them to understand their information capacities and give them some incentives and directions to improving their practices,” John says.
 
In the workshop, Developing a Digital Continuity Action Plan, John Roberts used Archives New Zealand’s experiences as a case study and worked with participants to think about issues and themes significant to their organisations.
 
“The workshop was very engaging and interactive,” John said, “and some of the people who attended are discussing with their senior management how to use the information.”
 
John said both sessions were well received, “there is keen international interest in the work that Archives New Zealand does, with many people watching our activities with much interest and holding our work in high regard.”
 

Conference highlights

Catriona Logan
For Catriona Logan, Repository Officer at Archives New Zealand’s Wellington office, ARANZ conferences are a good learning experience as well as providing inspiration and renewing connections with others in the archival field.
 
Volunteer archivist Marilyn Wightman, and Repository Officer Catriona Logan at the recent ARANZ Conference.
Left to right: Volunteer archivist Marilyn Wightman, and Repository Officer Catriona Logan at the recent ARANZ Conference.
 
This year Catriona says the presentations, in particular the talks on personal records, collection relocation and storage for the National Library, the Land Information New Zealand backlog and film preservation, all were of great interest.
 
She also was impressed by the tour through the Pacific Collection Storage Room at Te Papa Tongarewa. “The collection was very interesting and some of the storage methods were innovative,” she said.
 
For those who are contemplating attending the annual conference, Catriona says “go – they are well worth it.”
 
 
Peter Miller
 
Peter Miller (pictured above), Archives New Zealand’s Dunedin Regional Archivist, says there were a number of highlights for him at the ARANZ conference. 
Peter Miller (pictured above), Archives New Zealand’s Dunedin Regional Archivist, says there were a number of highlights for him at the ARANZ conference.
 
Firstly, the visit to Online Security Services’ records store at Porirua. This is an impressive facility, with its static shelving racks rising 23 metres from the floor, and all boxes to the topmost shelf accessed by forklift! Staff advised that there was no evidence of any decline in the growth of storage of paper records, despite the digital age.
 
Then there was the excellent and thought-provoking keynote address by Professor Randall Jimerson, from West Washington University, who focused on archivists, power and politics. His main thesis was that archivists exercise power – to shape a nation’s memory and provide access to it, and sometimes are faced with uncomfortable choices to make.
 
Finally, in three different sessions, Georgia Prince described the 2009 move at Auckland Public Library, of its heritage collections, with a number of innovative solutions found to move issues. This contrasted with the much larger shift at the National Library of New Zealand in 2009/10 to allow for the upgrade of that building, as John Franich detailed. Elizabeth Barge and Maria Andre of the Ministry of Justice gave a paper on the January 2010 flood in their Head Office premises, and its impact on records, and their salvage. All these speakers provided the audience with very valuable practical information based on their various experiences.
 

Volunteer sponsored to conference

Marilyn Wightman, a volunteer archivist at the Feilding and Districts Archive, was the recipient of Archives New Zealand’s Community Archives sponsorship to attend the 2010 ARANZ conference.
 
Community Archives Senior Adviser Polly Martin says, the decision to sponsor a volunteer to this year’s conference resulted from earlier discussions with the Wellington Sole Archivist group about what support and training provided by Archives New Zealand would be most useful for grass root archival practitioners.
 
Community Archives Senior Adviser Polly Martin and volunteer archivist Mariyln Wightman at the 2010 ARANZ Conference.

Above (left to right): Community Archives Senior Adviser Polly Martin and volunteer archivist Marilyn Wightman at the 2010 ARANZ Conference.
 
Nominations were accepted from around the country and were accompanied by a description of why the volunteer was being put forward. Marilyn Wightman was the winning name drawn from the hat by Acting Chief Archivist, Greg Goulding.
 
Marilyn manages other volunteers at the Feilding archive in the collating, conserving and recording of community records, journals and photographs. The archive was established through the collaboration of the Feilding & Districts Historical Society, The Feilding branch of the Genealogists and the Manawatu Historic Vehicle Collection trust in cooperation with Manawatu District Council and opened on Waitangi Day 2010.
 
Marilyn’s colleague Janet Doyle (FDCA Librarian) nominated her for the sponsorship saying:
 
“Marilyn puts a lot of time and effort into all aspects of the Archive's work and also into ensuring her volunteer staff are kept informed. If she was successful in gaining this sponsorship I know she would use anything she learned to the advantage of us all, and the wider community”
 
“The Community Archives team regretted that we were unable to sponsor all the nominees as the quality of work and commitment from volunteers was so high,” Polly said.
 
“Community-based archives often utilise the assistance of volunteers and in fact, some would not be able to operate if it wasn’t for this support. Accessing appropriate professional development can assist in maintaining enthusiasm and passion, whilst increasing the level of knowledge and skill in the role.”
 

Putting the context into archives

Behind the scenes at Archives New Zealand’s Wellington office, the Context Control archivists set the standards of descriptive information surrounding the archival holdings accessible through Archway the department’s online search system.

Manager of the Context Control team Greg Jennings say, “We set the metadata standards and check the accuracy of this information that tells the stories of our nation.

“It’s an ongoing process that involves understanding the new trends of digital information as well as working with the traditional paper-based documents. Our team provides advice around archival metadata to our colleagues here at Archives New Zealand as well as to community based archives and public sector projects, such as the digitisation projects.

“We are also responsible for bringing existing documentation into our new systems, revising early descriptive material and co-ordinating activities among other Arrangement & Description programmes.”

One major piece of work, says Greg, is the documentation and appraisal of the functions of government – the broad activities of government that generate public records.

Greg says a new area for the team is the coordination of the approved repository process. “We are providing the department with an overall view of archival process and how it can be developed and changed.

“We have recently been developing descriptive standards for artwork and audio, film and video archives and are currently working on standards for describing maps.”

Descriptive standards for listing art works came about while providing a comprehensive listing of the National Collection of War Art onto Archway for the first time.

“Our Context archivists have experience across the range of archival processes, having worked in various sections of the department.

The team of five, headed by Greg, are David Knight, Sonya Behrnes, Kyle Leota and Ruth Stoddart (based in Auckland).
 
Greg Jennings, David Knight, Kyle Leota and Sonya Behrnes.
Above, the Context Control Wellington team (left to right): Greg Jennings, David Knight, Kyle Leota and Sonya Behrnes.

Greg has an archival and library background, with 20 years experience in information and research in New Zealand and overseas. He joined Archives New Zealand in 2003 and became Context Control Manager in 2006.

Kyle started his career with the department as a reference officer and later as an archivist in Access Services. He has been with the Context team since October 2005.
 
Archivist Kyle Leota working in the Wellington office stacks.
Above: Archivist Kyle Leota working in the Wellington office stacks.
 
For Kyle, one major programme of work recently undertaken was the conversion of the record group to the GAIMS (Government Archives Integrated Management System) archival management system.
 
“The Agriculture record group needed to be fully converted into the current archival management system to make it accessible. This was a complex task as the records needed to be intellectually listed (descriptive information, access restrictions) and physically (re-boxed, and at times relocated) rearranged.
 
Sonya began her career with the department in 2003, as an archives support assistant with Access Services. Later that year, she joined the Record Group Backcapture Project team for two years, which was responsible for capturing the paper finding aids into Archway. She re-joined Access as an archivist before moving onto Arrangement and Description and then Context team in 2008.
 
Context Control Archivist, Sonya Behrnes.
Above: Context Control Archivist, Sonya Behrnes.
 
She has particularly enjoyed working on creating the descriptive standards for Art works, film, audio and video and the research involved in writing contextual documentation for Archway. Her current project is WA-J (War Archives Japan) programme which has entailed re-sorting archives into their original series, documenting the context of their creation, re-listing and re-boxing. These archives will be available on Archway for the first time when the project finishes at the end of the year.
 
Sonya says a special and great experience of working at Archives New Zealand was being part of the team who created the (physical and online) Impressive Silence Exhibition, 2008 to celebrate the 90th anniversary of Armistice Day.
 
Ruth Stoddart has been with Archives New Zealand for 30 years working in a variety of roles in that time in both Auckland and Wellington as an archivist, a Records Centre manager and Local Government training advisor. Ruth has recently been concentrating on the documentation of the broad government sectors (jurisdictions) which determine the structures of government.
 
 Auckland-based Context Control Archivist, Ruth Stoddart.
Above: Auckland-based Context Control Archivist, Ruth Stoddart.
 
David Knight started at Archives New Zealand in March 1998 as a retrieval assistant in Access Services. He later become a reference officer then an archivist. He has worked in Access Services, the Record Group Normalisation Project, Arrangement and Description, and joined the Context Control Unit in February 2007. He is also a PSA delegate.
 
Context Control Archivist David Knight at his desk in the Wellington office.
Above: Context Control Archivist David Knight at his desk in the Wellington office.
 
David says he particularly enjoyed being project manager for the Impressive Silence exhibition in 2008, and would love to be involved in exhibition work again. He also feels that the best part of working as an archivist is the satisfaction gained from knowing that you are helping to make the archives more accessible and discoverable to New Zealanders.
 

War experience lives on in archives

The war diaries of Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone, and the letters he wrote home are among the Alexander Turnbull Library collections currently accessible at Archives New Zealand’s Wellington office.
 
Donated to the Turnbull Library in 1988 by Malone’s grandson, these records have been used extensively by historians examining the experience of New Zealanders during the war.
 
Born in England, Malone migrated to Taranaki in 1880 to join a brother already settled in New Zealand. Farming by day, Malone also began to study law at night and in 1899 he qualified as a barrister.
 
When war broke out in August 1914, Malone was appointed to command the Wellington Battalion of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. The Battalion was part of the ANZAC corps that landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 25 April 1915.
 
In the following months Malone’s Battalion played a key offensive role, and on 8 August they seized Chunuk Bair, an achievement described as the one success of the August offensive.
 
Sadly that day also saw Malone killed by artillery fire.
 
Malone wrote his last letter (pictured below) on 5 August 1915, three days before his death, to his wife Ida Katherine Withers; it began, “My sweetheart”. Many of the collection’s letters are written to Ida.
 
Letter by Malone
 
Malone’s writings, including the diaries documenting his military experience, are the basis of No better death: the great war diaries and letters of William G Malone, a publication edited by John Crawford and Peter Cooke.
 
Selected Turnbull collection items, including the letters and diaries of Malone, are currently available at Archives New Zealand’s Wellington office while the National Library building is being redeveloped. The National Library building will reopen in 2012.

 

News Bytes

New front door for Wellington office
The installation of a new front door has capped off the Archives New Zealand Wellington office ground floor development project.
 
Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding officially opening the Wellington office's new entranceway.
Above: Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding officially opening the Wellington office's new entranceway.
 
Officially opening the door on 25 August, Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding said, “the old revolving door would hold memories, fond and otherwise, for all who passed through it: the school children who loved the door so much will be sad to see it go; and many of our customers who avoided using it will be glad it has been replaced.”
 

Acclaim Award for Anna
Arrangement and Description Archivist Anna Henry played a key part in the Archway Item Redevelopment programme to improve our archival management system, and she given an award in recognition of her work
 
Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding presents Arrangment and Description Archivist, Anna Henry with the first first ever Archives New Zealand Acclaim Award.
Above: Acting Chief Executive Greg Goulding presents Arrangment and Description Archivist, Anna Henry with the first ever Archives New Zealand Acclaim Award.
 
The programme, led by the department’s Technology Services aimed to resolve existing deficits, upgrade current functions, and add enhancements.
 
Anna worked on the user side of the programme. “I coordinated feedback on business requirements, tested the new system, and analysed and worked to resolve data issues,” she said.
 
Anna received the first ever Archives New Zealand Acclaim Award in recognition of the time she spent on this programme alongside her usual work,
 

Archives New Zealand on British television

The story of British television presenter Monty Don’s ancestry, featured on BBC’s Who Do You Think You Are, came to life with the help of Archives New Zealand.
 
Information provided by our Christchurch office made it onto the show that traces the family trees of celebrities, exploring the lives of their ancestors and uncovering major themes in British social history.
 
For more details on the episode, and Archives New Zealand mentions, go to: http://www.bbcwhodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/episode/monty-don
 

New appointment for Dianne Macaskill
 
Dianne Macaskill

Dianne Macaskill, Archives New Zealand’s Chief Executive and Chief Archivist from 2001 to 2009, was recently appointed to the Independent Police Conduct Authority (http://www.ipca.govt.nz/Site/about/default.aspx for more information).
 
Dianne is also Vice-President of the Pacific Regional Branch International Council of Archives (PARBCIA) and is a member of the Audit and Assurance Committee for the Ministry of Education.

 
National Digital Forum on the horizon
The ninth annual National Digital Forum conference will be help on 18-19 October 2010, at Te Papa Tongarewa, in Wellington.
 
This year’s theme is Linking people, linking data and participants will be exploring the issues and opportunities surrounding: connecting our collections, linking up with each other, using data, working with communities (iwi, family historians), and working with content creators and consumers.
 
For more information, go to http://ndf.natlib.govt.nz/about/2010-conference.htm.
 

Showcasing the National Film Unit Collection

Thirty films from the National Film Unit (NFU) collection held at Archives New Zealand are being showcased on NZOn Screen.

Providing a valuable insight into New Zealand’s screen history, the films include classics: Rhythm and Movement, Ralph Hotere; Snows of Aorangi, Score; Gone up North for a While, Games 74; Governor, This is New Zealand, and many more. To view the films: http://www.nzonscreen.com/collection/national-film-unit-collection

The NFU was established in August 1941 as a result of a Cabinet decision to provide film publicity of New Zealand’s war effort. For almost 50 years, the Unit produced a diverse range of films, from wartime newsreels to tourism promotions to historical television dramas.

The Wellington office of Archives New Zealand took over responsibility for the restoration and preservation of the National Film Unit’s extensive archival film collection in 1988.