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Appendix A


EOI ‘Primary’ documents/records referenced in this Standard
Table A1 provides an overview of documents, and the EOI objectives they can be used to satisfy. Documents/records that are used to meet Objective C (presenting person links to identity) must be used in conjunction with either in-person or trusted referee verification that the photo in the document is that of the claimant of the identity. Included in Table A1 is a column for documents that can be used to provide evidence of a name change.

Table A1 – Documents used for Evidence of Identity Processes
Document
Issuing Agency
Objective
Name Change
A
That
the
identity
exists
B
Identity is living
C
The presenting person links to the identity
D
Presenter is sole claimant of the identity
E
Use of the identity in the community.
New Zealand PassportDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
tick
New Zealand Emergency Travel DocumentDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
tick
New Zealand Refugee Travel DocumentDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
tick
New Zealand Certificate of Identity (issued under the Passports Act 1992)Department of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
tick
New Zealand Certificate of Identity (issued under the Immigration Act 1987)Department of Labour (NZ Immigration Service)
tick
tick
New Zealand Firearms or Dealer’s LicencesNew Zealand Police
tick
tick
New Zealand Birth CertificateDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
tick
New Zealand Citizenship CertificateDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
New Zealand Death CertificateDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
New Zealand Driver LicenceLand Transport New Zealand
tick8
tick
xx
18+ CardHospitality Association of New Zealand
tick10
tick
Community Services CardMinistry of Social Development
tick
Electoral roll recordEnrolment Centre of New Zealand Post
tick
IR NumberInland Revenue Department
tick
New Zealand Marriage CertificateDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
New Zealand Civil Union CertificateDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
tick
8Needs to be considered alongside documents that satisfy Objective A (that the identity exists).

10As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.


For each document/record listed in Table A1, details are provided in Appendix A on the following:

Issuing AgencyAgency responsible for issuing the document.
PurposeThe purpose of the document.
InformationDetails on identity information contained in the document and other non-identity information such as document number and dates of issue and expiry.
Document featuresDetails about features of the documents, such as security features.
ValidityPeriod that the document is issued for.
Issuance processDetails about the processes, specifically for evidence of identity, involved in the issuance of the document.
LegislationEnabling legislation, if any, for issue of the document.
Standard fitDescriptions of EOI objectives that the document can be used for.
Further informationLink to further information available on the web.


New Zealand Passport
Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
PurposeAn official government document certifying identity and citizenship and granting permission to travel abroad.
InformationInformation about a person contained in a New Zealand Passport includes:
  • first/given name(s) and surname/family name(s)
  • date of birth
  • place of birth
  • gender
  • photo of individual
  • nationality.

Other information in a New Zealand Passport includes:
  • passport type
  • issuing state
  • issuing authority
  • passport number
  • dates of issue and expiry.
Document featuresThe form of the New Zealand Passport is governed by an international convention to which New Zealand is a signatory. Currently it is a booklet with a data page, a number of visa pages and a number of security features.

Further information about security features contained in the New Zealand Passport is available by contacting the Department of Internal Affairs.

ValidityNew Zealand Passports issued from 21 April 2005 have a maximum validity of five years. New Zealand Passports issued previous to this date have a maximum validity of ten years.
Issuance processTo legally obtain a New Zealand Passport, an applicant must be a New Zealand citizen. First-time applicants must fill out a passport application form and provide evidence of event details that have occurred in New Zealand, such as birth, citizenship, and change of name. Electronic verification against birth and death records occurs as part of the issuance process to verify that information provided is genuine.

Applicants for a passport renewal must provide their current or expired New Zealand Passport and, if applicable, documentation that confirms their change of name (e.g. a Marriage or Civil Union Certificate).

A witness who meets specified criteria9 must fill out a ‘proof of identity’ section verifying the applicant’s identity. The witness must also provide contact details and certify that the photo provided represents a true likeness of the applicant and is less than 12 months old.

LegislationPassports Act 1992.
Standard fitA New Zealand Passport can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

A New Zealand Passport provides confirmation of an individual’s name and date and place of birth, and what they look like. It also provides confirmation that the individual is a New Zealand citizen.

The photo inside the New Zealand Passport enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information inside the passport 10

Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=561
9 The witness must not: be a relative or part of the family group of the applicant; be a partner of the applicant; or live at the same address as the applicant. The witness must: have known the applicant for at least 12 months (or since birth for children less than 12 months); be 16 years or over; and be a holder of a valid New Zealand passport, or be from one of these groups: lawyer, teacher, minister of religion, police officer, kaumatua, registered medical professional, justice of the peace, applicant’s employer.

10As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.


New Zealand Emergency Travel Document
Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
PurposeThe New Zealand Emergency Travel Document (ETD) is a short-term, machine-readable travel document issued to New Zealand citizens who have previously been issued a New Zealand Passport, which is lost, stolen or damaged while they are overseas, and who need to travel urgently.
InformationInformation about a person contained in an ETD includes:
  • first/given name(s) and surname/family name(s)
  • date of birth
  • place of birth
  • gender
  • photo of individual
  • nationality.

Other information in an ETD includes:
  • ETD type
  • issuing state
  • issuing authority
  • passport number
  • dates of issue and expiry.
Document featuresThe form of the ETD is governed by an international convention to which New Zealand is a signatory. Currently it is a booklet with a data page, a number of visa pages and a number of security features.

ETDs have been issued from 26 October 2004. The document has been introduced to improve the overall security of New Zealand travel documentation by ensuring New Zealanders overseas have access to a secure and internationally accepted short-term emergency travel document. As manual11 passports will no longer be issued, the introduction of the ETD will reduce the number of manual passports (which are less secure) in circulation.

Further information about security features contained in the ETD is available by contacting the Department of Internal Affairs.

ValidityAn ETD is valid for up to 12 months.
Issuance processTo obtain an ETD an applicant must be a New Zealand citizen who has previously been issued a New Zealand Passport.

The process for issuance of an ETD is comparable to that for the renewal of a New Zealand Passport. This includes proof of identity from a witness, cross-checking against the Passport record, and death record checking.

As with the New Zealand Passport process, a witness who meets the criteria12 must fill out a ‘proof of identity’ section certifying the applicant’s identity. They must also provide contact details and certify that the photo represents a true likeness of the applicant and is less than 12 months old.

To receive a New Zealand Passport, after the issuance of an ETD, an individual must subsequently submit a newly completed passport application.

LegislationPassports Act 1992.
Standard fitAn ETD can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

An ETD provides confirmation of an individual’s name and date and place of birth, and what they look like. It also provides confirmation that the individual is a New Zealand citizen.

The photo inside the ETD enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information inside the ETD13.

Further informationwww.dia.govt.nz
11The term manual passport refers to non machine-readable passports.

12Criteria: The witness must not: be a relative or part of the family group of the applicant; be a partner of the applicant; or live at the same address as the applicant. The witness must: have known the applicant for at least 12 months (or since birth for children less than 12 months); be 16 years or over; and have a daily contact telephone number and be available during normal business hours.

13As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.


New Zealand Refugee Travel Document
Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
PurposeAn official government document, issued to people who are not New Zealand citizens and whose refugee status has been confirmed by the New Zealand Immigration Service, that enables travel abroad.
InformationInformation about a person contained in a Refugee Travel Document (RTD) includes:
  • first/given name(s) and surname/family name(s)
  • date of birth
  • place of birth
  • gender
  • photo of individual
  • nationality.

Other information in an RTD includes:
  • type
  • issuing state
  • issuing authority
  • document number
  • dates of issue and expiry.
Document featuresA booklet with a data page containing identity information about the individual. It is issued in accordance with United Nations Protocols.
ValidityAn RTD is valid for between one and four years.
Issuance processApplicants complete an ‘Application for a Certificate of Identity or Refugee Travel Document’. Another person, who meets criteria14 fills in a ‘Proof of Identity’ section.

Department of Internal Affairs staff check that the applicant does not already hold a New Zealand Passport and compare information from the New Zealand Immigration Service with that on the application.

Applicants must have proof of refugee status and provide two passport-style photographs and any one of:

  • a Certificate of Identity (from the New Zealand Immigration Service)
  • a birth certificate
  • a passport from their country of origin
  • the travel document they used to enter New Zealand
  • a New Zealand Residence Permit/Returning Resident’s Visa/Work Permit or Visitor’s Visa, or
  • a letter from the New Zealand Immigration Service confirming residence or refugee status.
  • Applications are most commonly accompanied by one of the last two options in this list. Identity details are based on information from the New Zealand Immigration Service.
LegislationPassports Act 1992.
Standard fitAn RTD can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

An RTD provides confirmation of an individual’s name, nationality, date and place of birth, and what they look like. It also provides confirmation that the individual is not a New Zealand citizen and has refugee status.

The photo inside the RTD enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information inside the RTD15

Further informationwww.dia.govt.nz
14Criteria that must be met are that they: have known the individual for more than 12 months; are over 18 years of age; have a daytime contact telephone number; are not a relative; and do not live at the same address as the applicant.

15As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.

NOTE – RTDs can be issued solely on the basis of a statutory declaration, without corresponding EOI to reinforce the data. This document, therefore, should not be used on its own to verify the holder’s identity.

    New Zealand Certificate of Identity (issued under the Passports Act 1992)

    Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
    PurposeAn official government document, issued to people who are not New Zealand citizens and who are unable to obtain a passport of their own nationality, that enables them to travel abroad.
    InformationInformation about a person contained in a Certificate of Identity includes:
    • first/given name(s) and surname/family name(s)
    • date of birth
    • place of birth
    • gender
    • photo of individual
    • nationality.

    Other information in a Certificate of Identity includes:
    • type
    • issuing state
    • issuing authority
    • document number
    • dates of issue and expiry.
    Document featuresA booklet with a data page containing identity information about the individual. It is issued in accordance with United Nations Protocols.
    ValidityA Certificate of Identity is valid for between one and four years.
    Issuance processApplicants complete an ‘Application for a Certificate of Identity or Refugee Travel Document’. Another person, who meets set criteria16 fills in a ‘Proof of Identity’ section.

    Department of Internal Affairs staff check that the applicant does not already hold a New Zealand Passport and compare information from the New Zealand Immigration Service with that on the application.

    Applicants must provide two passport-style photographs and any one of:

    • a Certificate of Identity (from the New Zealand Immigration Service)
    • a birth certificate
    • a passport from their country of origin
    • the travel document they used to enter New Zealand
    • a New Zealand Residence Permit/Returning Resident’s Visa/Work Permit or Visitor’s Visa
    • a letter from the New Zealand Immigration Service confirming residence or refugee status.

    Applications are most commonly accompanied by one of the last two options in this list. Identity details are based on information from the New Zealand Immigration Service.
    LegislationPassports Act 1992.
    Standard fitA Certificate of Identity can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

    A Certificate of Identity provides confirmation of an individual’s name, nationality, date and place of birth, and what they look like. It also provides confirmation that the individual is not a New Zealand citizen.

    The photo inside the Certificate of Identity enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information inside the Certificate of Identity17

    Further informationwww.dia.govt.nz
    16Criteria that must be met are that they: have known the individual for more than 12 months; are over 18 years of age; have a daytime contact telephone number; are not a relative; and do not live at the same address as the applicant.

    17As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.

    NOTE – Certificates of Identity can, in some cases, be issued solely on the basis of a statutory declaration, without corresponding EOI to reinforce the data. Therefore, this document should not be used on its own to verify the holder’s identity.

      New Zealand Certificate of Identity (issued under the Immigration Act 1987)
      Issuing agencyDepartment of Labour (NZ Immigration Service)
      PurposeAn identity document issued to people who are not New Zealand citizens and are unable to obtain a passport of their own nationality. A Certificate of Identity is generally issued to refugees coming to, or people who have entered, New Zealand, with no form of documentary evidence on their identity.
      InformationInformation about a person contained in a Certificate of Identity includes:
      • name of holder
      • date of birth
      • country of birth
      • photo of the individual.

        Other information in a Certificate of Identity includes:

      • date of issue
      • Certificate of Identity number.
      Document featuresA folded card-type document that contains a photograph of the owner.
      ValidityVariable, on a case-by-case basis. A Certificate of Identity is normally valid for one or two years.
      Issuance processCertificates of Identity are issued by the New Zealand Immigration Service and in accordance with policies from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

      As a minimum requirement to establish identity, the applicant must sign a statutory declaration. The circumstances surrounding the issue of this document make it difficult to verify their details.

      LegislationImmigration Act 1987.
      Standard fitA Certificate of Identity can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

      It provides information on an individual’s name, nationality and date and place of birth, and what they should look like. It also indicates that they are not a New Zealand citizen and will either have refugee status or have no other form of documentary evidence to prove their identity.

      The photo inside the Certificate of Identity enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information inside the Certificate of Identity18

      Further informationwww.immigration.govt.nz/
      18As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.
        NOTE – Certificates of Identity can, in some cases, be issued solely on the basis of a statutory declaration, without corresponding EOI to reinforce the data. Therefore, this document should not be used on its own to verify the holder’s identity.

        New Zealand Firearms Licence/Firearms Dealer’s Licence

        Issuing agencyNew Zealand Police
        PurposeA Firearms Licence allows an individual to have and use various types of firearms.

        A Firearms Dealer’s Licence is for arms dealers who buy, sell or make firearms by way of business.

        InformationInformation about a person contained on a Firearms and Dealers Licence includes:

        · given name(s) and family name
        · date of birth
        · photo of the individual.

        Firearms and Firearms Dealer’s Licences also contain a licence number.

        Document featuresCredit-card-size licence that includes a photograph of the owner.
        ValidityA Firearms Licence is valid for 10 years unless sooner revoked or surrendered.

        A Firearms Dealer’s Licence is valid for one year.

        Issuance processApplications for a New Zealand Firearms Licence must be made in person at an Arms Office19 The applicant must fill out a ‘New Zealand Firearms Licence Application Form’ and provide:
        • an old firearms licence (if applicable)
        • two recent passport-style photos
        • original documents meeting the current police ‘proof of identity point system’, which requires applicants to produce original documents totalling 100 points (e.g. a current passport is worth 70 points, and a birth certificate 40 points)
        • contact details of two referees – one must be the applicant’s spouse or next of kin, the other over 20 years of age and not related to the applicant.

        The applicant must sign the application in front of a Member of Police, who is also required to fill out a witness section and verify the photo is that of the applicant.

        The applicant is vetted according to the Firearms Licence Vetting Guide. It verifies the applicant’s suitability to possess and use firearms (and does place some emphasis on determining their identity). Applicants and all referees are interviewed, with referee questions specific to identity.

        LegislationArms Act 1983.
        Standard fitA Firearms Licence or Firearms Dealer’s Licence can be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists), and in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity).

        The Firearms Licence or Firearms Dealer’s Licence provides confirmation of an individual’s name, date of birth and what they should look like.

        The photo on the Firearms Licence or Firearms Dealer’s Licence enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information on the Firearms Licence or Firearms Dealer’s Licence20

        Further informationwww.police.govt.nz
        19An Arms Office is any police station or police office appointed as such by the Commissioner. The Commissioner has declared all police premises to be Arms Offices for the purpose of receiving applications for a firearms licence.

        20As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.


        New Zealand Birth Certificate

          Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
          PurposeTo provide an official record of births registered in New Zealand.
          InformationContains registered information about an individual’s birth, including:
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s)21
          • gender
          • still-birth/multiple birth
          • date and place of birth
          • information about the parent(s) – given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s); date and place of birth and occupation.

          NOTE – Information about change of name, adoption and gender reassignment is set out in Appendix C.
          Document featuresAn official birth record is registered information contained within the New Zealand Birth Register, and provides confirmation that a birth occurred in relation to the named individual and their parents.

          A New Zealand Birth Certificate is a printed subset of the birth record.

          ValidityA New Zealand Birth Certificate has no validity period associated with it.
          Issuance processA Preliminary Notice of Birth is sent to the Registrar22

          A Notification of Birth for Registration is sent to the Registrar by the child’s parent(s). There is no set time limit, but registrations more than two years after the birth must be referred to the Registrar-General23

          Details on the Preliminary Notice of Birth and those on the Notification of Birth for Registration are linked on the Births Registry system. The child’s birth record and registration details are now, at this point, in the system. Registration cannot occur without the notice of birth having been entered.

          The Birth Register is a public register. As such, any individual can be issued a New Zealand Birth Certificate or printout of the birth record, providing the request is in respect of a named individual and that they supply the required information (e.g. the name, date and place details contained on the birth record).

          LegislationBirths, Deaths, and Marriages Registration (BDMR) Act 1995. The BDMR Act requires all births in New Zealand to be registered. If applicants claim to have been born in New Zealand but cannot produce their New Zealand Birth Certificate24 (or their official birth record cannot be verified) they should be advised to register their birth with Births, Deaths and Marriages (Department of Internal Affairs)25
          Standard fitA New Zealand Birth Certificate (or verification against the birth record) can only be used to meet the requirements of Objective A (that the identity exists).

          The New Zealand Birth Certificate should not be used as the sole form of evidence for asserting an individual’s identity, as it does not provide any link to the person presenting it (for example, in the way a passport does). New Zealand Birth Certificates contain a warning to the effect that “this certificate is not evidence of the person presenting it”.

          Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=1271
        21Any New Zealand Birth Certificate issued after the new name has been registered will show both the name registered at birth and all changes of name for that person.

        22“Registrar” means a person for the time being holding office under section 81(1) of the BDMR Act; and includes the Registrar-General and every Deputy Registrar-General. by the hospital, doctor, midwife or occupier of the premises where the birth took place, within five working days of the birth.

        23“Registrar-General” means the Registrar-General appointed under section 79(1) of the BDMR Act and includes every Deputy Registrar-General.

        24Except where the applicant’s birth record is closed for a particular reason.

        25A small number of individuals are not registered. For example, at 13 October 2003, 220 out of 57,574 births (or 0.38% of the total) were still unregistered from 1998. Births, Deaths and Marriages sends notifications that children need to be registered, but this process is reliant on the parent(s) or guardian(s) supplying the information.

        New Zealand Citizenship Certificate

          Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
          PurposeAn official government document, issued to people who are granted New Zealand citizenship (either by grant or descent).
          InformationInformation about a person contained on a Citizenship Certificate includes:
          • name of individual (at time of citizenship grant or registration)
          • gender
          • date of birth
          • place of birth
          • effective date of citizenship.
          Document featuresA landscaped A4 size printout of the above information, containing security features.
          ValidityThere is no validity period associated with a Citizenship Certificate.
          Issuance processTo meet the criteria for the issue of a New Zealand Citizenship Certificate, an individual must:
          • obtain citizenship by descent, or
          • obtain citizenship by grant.

          Applicants for citizenship by descent or grant must provide original documentation that establishes their identity. This includes:
          • two identical passport-sized photographs (one certified by a witness as a true likeness of the applicant)
          • birth certificate(s)
          • passport(s) (from their current country of citizenship)
          • travel document(s)
          • marriage certificate(s) (if applicable)
          • proof of name change (if applicable)
          • Certificate of Identity (generally from refugees).

          The individual’s identity is determined by combining this information. Details from the application are entered into the citizenship system. Case officers assess applications and, once the grant of citizenship is approved, applicants must take an oath or affirmation of allegiance at a Citizenship Ceremony to receive their Citizenship Certificate (this is not a requirement if receiving citizenship by descent and in some other exceptional cases).

          NOTE – Photos of the applicant are scanned into the system and linked to their file (the photo does not appear on their Citizenship Certificate). The witness who certified the photo is not contacted to verify identity; the photos are used to match those in documentation accompanying the application (e.g. a passport).

          LegislationCitizenship Act 1977.
          Standard fitA Citizenship Certificate can be used to meet Objective A (that the identity exists).

          It provides confirmation of an individual’s name and date and place of birth. Information on the certificate is consistent with original documentation (provided by the applicant for identification purposes).

          Although a photo of the applicant is kept on the citizenship system, it does not appear on the certificate. This means a Citizenship Certificate should not be used to meet Objective C (presenting person links to identity).

          Further informationwww.dia.govt.nz
        Evidentiary Certificates
        These certificates provide confirmation of citizenship and are available for New Zealand- born citizens, or where a citizen’s details have changed since the issuance of the certificate e.g. through a change of name or gender reassignment. These are not common and are issued in the form of an open letter on official letterhead.


        New Zealand Death Certificate
          Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
          PurposeTo provide an official record of deaths registered in New Zealand.
          InformationContains registered information on an individual’s death, including:
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s)
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) at birth
          • date, place and cause(s) of death
          • name of certifying doctor
          • date last seen alive by certifying doctor
          • gender
          • age and date of birth
          • place of birth
          • usual residential address
          • occupation
          • date and place of burial/cremation
          • age of children
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) of parent(s)
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) of parent(s) at birth
          • occupation of parent(s)
          • relationship details of the deceased.
          Document featuresAn official death record is the registered information contained within the New Zealand death registry, and provides confirmation that a death occurred in relation to the named individual and their parents. A Death Certificate is a printed subset of the death record.
          ValidityA Death Certificate has no validity period associated with it.
          Issuance processA Notification of Death for Registration is sent to the Registrar26 within three working days after disposal of the body. This form is accompanied by either a Medical Certificate of Causes of Death, a Medical Certificate of Causes of Foetal and Neonatal Death or an Order for Disposal.

          The Births, Deaths and Marriages system registers this information and link it, for births since 1998, to a birth record. Where a match with a birth record has been identified, both files are flagged. If a New Zealand Birth Certificate is subsequently issued, the word ‘deceased’ appears on it.

          Once the information is registered, anyone can request any named Death Certificate.

          LegislationBirths, Deaths, and Marriages Registration (BDMR) Act 1995.

          Any government agency that wishes to know if a birth that has been registered was the birth of a person who has since died, or a still-birth, may apply to the Registrar-Genera26 for information, and the Registrar-General is obliged, on payment of the prescribed fee, to have a search undertaken and provide the applicant with the result of that search.

          Standard fitA Death Certificate (or electronic verification against the Death Register information) can only be used to meet the requirements of Objective B (that it is a living identity).

          Verifying applicant details against death records will help to determine whether an identity has been recorded as deceased. However, having no record that a person has died does not necessarily mean that they are still alive (see note below).

          Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=1271
        26“Registrar” means a person for the time being holding office under section 81(1) of the BDMR Act; and includes the Registrar-General and every Deputy Registrar-General.

        26 “Registrar-General” means the Registrar-General appointed under section 79(1) of the BDMR Act and includes every Deputy Registrar-General.

                  NOTE –
                  Death notifications are generated and sent to agencies that Births, Deaths and Marriages has statutory obligations to notify (e.g. Registrar of Electors).
                    There are currently no provisions to share death information with foreign death registries, and currently Births, Deaths and Marriages do not access foreign registries to match death and birth information. So there is a potential risk associated with verifying against death records, in that individuals may have died overseas and not be recorded as ‘deceased’ within the New Zealand death register.

          New Zealand Driver Licence
            Issuing agencyLand Transport New Zealand
            PurposeA Driver Licence provides evidence that the individual named and photographed has a licence to drive.
            InformationInformation about a person contained on a Driver Licence includes:
            • given name(s) and family name
            • date of birth
            • their signature
            • their address
            • photo of the individual.

            Other information on a Driver Licence includes:
            • issue and expiry dates
            • donor indicator
            • driver licence number
            • card version number
            • class of licence
            • graduated classes/endorsements
            • class/endorsements for conditions.
                Document features
            Credit-card-size document with a photograph of the holder and their signature.
                Validity
            Valid for a period of ten years.
                Issuance process
            Applications must be made in person to a licensing agent 28. The applicant must fill out the necessary driver licence applications and bring with them one form of primary identification in accordance with EOI requirements specified in Clause 1 ‘Identification’ Land Transport (Driver Licensing) Rule 1999. Forms of primary identification include: New Zealand Passport*; New Zealand Driver Licence or overseas driver licence*, certificate issued under the Citizenship Act 1977; and Firearms Licence*.

            Applicants must also provide one form of evidence showing their name and address, such as: an account issued in the previous 12 months; a utility (e.g. telephone or power) account issued in the previous six months; or an appropriate form of identification issued within the previous 12 months that includes their address.

            Customer service representatives process the application and if applicable take the applicant’s photo and an electronic impression of the signature.

            * Must be current or has expired within the two years immediately preceding the application date.

                Legislation
            Land Transport Act 1998.
                Standard fit
            A New Zealand Driver Licence on its own can be used to meet Objective E (use of the identity in the community). It can also be used to satisfy, in part, Objective C (presenting person links to the identity), so long as it is considered alongside documents that satisfy Objective A (that the identity exists).

            A Driver Licence provides confirmation of an individual’s name and date of birth and what they should look like. It also provides confirmation that the holder is allowed to drive vehicles subject to their licensing classes.

            The photo on a Driver Licence enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information on the Driver Licence29.

            Further informationwww.ltsa.govt.nz

          28A licensing agent is the Director or a person to whom the Director has delegated functions and powers under section 205(2) of the Land Transport Act 1998 in relation to the issuing, renewal and replacement of driver licences.

          29As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.

          18+ Card

            Issuing agencyHospitality Association of New Zealand
            PurposeThe 18+ Card is used in lieu of a New Zealand Passport or a New Zealand Driver Licence as proof of age identity to purchase alcohol or gain admittance into licensed premises.
            InformationInformation about a person contained on an 18+ Card includes:

            · given name(s) and family name
            · date of birth
            · their signature
            · photo of the individual.

            Other information on an 18+ Card includes:

            · expiry date
            · card number.

            Document featuresCredit-card-size document with a photograph of the holder.
            ValidityValid for a period of ten years.
            Issuance processTo obtain an 18+ Card applicants must provide a recent passport-size photo and one of the following forms of evidence of identification:
            • New Zealand Passport*
            • New Zealand Driver Licence*
            • Overseas passport*
            • Certificate of Identity (issued under the Passports Act 1992)*
            • Refugee Travel Document.*

            Or, if applicants use any of the following documents, they must also have an Identifier Statement30 completed and photo endorsed.
            • Citizenship Certificate
            • Certificate of Identity (issued under the Immigration Act 1987)*
            • A confirmation of residence permit
            • New Zealand Birth Certificate
            • Birth certificate from overseas country containing information equivalent to that contained in a New Zealand Birth Certificate.

            * Must be current or has expired in the two years prior to the application.


            The applicant must also produce one of the following additional forms of evidence confirming the name and address of the applicant:

            • An account statement, issued to the applicant in the 12 months immediately preceding the date of the application, from a bank, building society, credit union, or credit card issuer
            • A telephone, gas, or electricity account issued to the applicant in the six months immediately preceding the date of the application
            • A letter from an employer or educational institute which is dated not more than 12 months preceding the date of application and includes the name and address of the applicant.
            LegislationSale of Liquor Act 1989.
            Standard fitAn 18+ Card on its own can be used to meet Objective E (use of the identity in the community). It can also be used to satisfy Objective C (presenting person links to identity), so long as it is considered alongside documents that satisfy Objective A (that the identity exists).

            An 18+ Card provides confirmation of an individual’s name and date of birth and what they should look like.

            The photo on an 18+ Card enables in-person verification – whereby the viewer (e.g. an agency staff member) can establish that the presenter links to the information on the 18+ Card31. For many people, particularly youth, this is the only form of photographic identification that they may have.

            Further informationwww.hanz.org.nz
          30To be completed by a person who is over 20 years of age, possesses a current Passport or NZ Driver Licence, and has known the applicant for one year or more. This person is not allowed to be a relative, spouse or partner, or living at the same address as the applicant.

          31As long as the person comparing the photo in the passport to the individual standing in front of them is confident that they match.

          Community Services Card

            Issuing agencyMinistry of Social Development
            PurposeA credit-card-type document that enables holders to obtain subsidies when visiting the doctor or paying for prescriptions.
            InformationInformation about a person contained on a Community Services Card includes:

            · given name(s) and family name
            · the individual’s signature (on the back of the card).

            Other information on a Community Service Card includes:

            · client number
            · issue and expiry dates.

            Document featuresA credit-card-type document. It does not contain a photograph of the holder.
            Validity Validity of three to 24 months from date of issue, depending on the holder’s situation.
            Issuance processApplicants must complete an ‘Application for Community Services Card’ form and provide proof of income and identity to show they are entitled to the Card. First-time applicants are required to have a Proof of Identity section completed by a person who:

            · is over 18 years of age
            · has known the applicant for at least 12 months
            · is not a relative
            · does not live at the same address as the applicant.

            Applicants not born in New Zealand are required to send a copy of their visa or Citizenship Certificate.

            Applicant details are checked to confirm eligibility. There are no requirements to provide documentation establishing identity, although processing officers may ask for further information in certain circumstances (e.g. for proof of income).

            LegislationSocial Security Act 1964.
            Standard fitA Community Services Card can be used to meet Objective E (use of the identity in the community).
            Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=661




          Electoral roll record
            Issuing agencyMinistry of Justice
            PurposeA publicly available publication, by electorate, listing details of everyone who is enrolled to vote at the date the roll is printed.
            InformationInformation contained in the electoral roll about individuals includes:
            • full name
            • residential address
            • occupation.

            A letter of confirmation of enrolment is posted by the Registrar once the elector has been enrolled.

            Copies of the electoral roll can be purchased in hard copy per electorate.

            Document featuresSee above.
            Validity Prior to major electoral events an enrolment update campaign is undertaken whereby all registered electors are mailed a copy of the enrolment details and provided the opportunity to update them, if necessary.
            Issuance processAll eligible electors must enrol as a voter. To qualify, they must:
            • be 18 years of age or older
            • be a New Zealand citizen or a permanent resident and have lived in New Zealand for 12 months continuously at some stage.
            LegislationElectoral Act 1993.
            Standard fitAn electoral roll record can be used to meet Objective E (use of the identity in the community).

            Agencies can either:

            • verify applicant details against the printed electoral roll
            • request that the individual supply their confirmation of enrolment letter.
            Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=1494

          IR Number


          Issuing agencyInland Revenue Department (IR)
          PurposeA registered number corresponding to an individual or organisation for taxation purposes. All individuals receiving income in New Zealand are required to have an IR number.
          InformationIndividuals being issued with an IR number for the first time or receiving confirmation of an existing number are issued with a lightweight card that contains their full name and the IR number.

          Statements from Inland Revenue Department also contain the above information, plus the person’s address.

          Document featuresSee above.
          Validity An IR number has no validity period associated with it.
          Issuance processApplicants must complete the appropriate application form and send a photocopy of one of the following documents for identification purposes:
          • Birth certificate
          • New Zealand Passport
          • 18+ Card
          • Overseas passport
          • Certificate of Citizenship
          • Photo-ID Driver licence.

          Processing officers check name and date of birth information against current data. If there is a match, they send the applicant’s previous IR number. A new IR number is issued if there is no match with current data.
          LegislationTax Administration Act 1994.
          Standard fitAn IR card or statement can be used to meet Objective E (use of the identity in the community).
          Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=804


          New Zealand Marriage Certificate
            Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
            PurposeTo provide an official record of marriages registered in New Zealand.
            InformationContains registered information about a couple’s marriage as at time of the marriage, including:
            • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) of each partner
            • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) at birth of each partner
            • date and place of birth of each partner
            • usual occupation of each partner
            • relationship status
            • date and location when the marriage was solemnised
            • usual residential address
            • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) for each partner’s parent(s)
            • surname/ family name(s) at birth for each partner’s parent(s).
            Document featuresThe marriage record is the registered information pertaining to marriages contained within the marriage register. A Marriage Certificate is a printed subset of the record that provides confirmation that a marriage took place in relation to the bride and bridegroom and their parent(s).
            Validity A Marriage Certificate has no validity period associated with it.
            Issuance processTo initiate the process, one of the parties getting married must first complete a Notice of Intended Marriage and sign a statutory declaration on the form.

            If the individuals are ‘legally free’ to marry, a Marriage Licence is issued and is valid for three months. During this period the marriage ceremony takes place, and the marriage celebrant returns a copy of the Particulars of Marriage to the Registrar32 within 10 working days of the ceremony. If the marriage ceremony does not take place during this period, it is recorded that the “Marriage did not take place”.

            Department of Internal Affairs staff enter this data to the marriage register once the marriage has taken place.

            At the time of marriage, the parties are given a copy of the Particulars of Marriage that can be used as an official document to confirm that a marriage took place.

            Once the information is registered, anyone can request a copy of a Marriage Certificate, provided they provide baseline details that are contained on the record (e.g. names of parties to the marriage and the date and place of the marriage).

            LegislationBirths, Deaths, and Marriages Registration (BDMR) Act 1995.
            Standard fitThe Marriage Certificate can be used to prove officially that a person can use the partner’s surname as her/his own surname. As such, a Marriage Certificate only provides corroborative evidence about the use of a married name.

            Because the identification of applicants is based upon a statutory declaration and anyone is able to request a named Marriage Certificate, this Certificate should not be used as a primary form of identification.

            Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=1271

          32“Registrar” means a person for the time being holding office under section 81(1) of the BDMR Act,; and includes the Registrar-General and every Deputy Registrar-General.

          New Zealand Civil Union Certificate


          Issuing agencyDepartment of Internal Affairs (Identity Services)
          PurposeTo provide an official record of civil unions registered in New Zealand.
          InformationContains registered information about a couple’s civil union as at time of entering the civil union, including:
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) of each partner
          • given/first name(s)and surname/family name(s) at birth of each partner
          • date and place of birth of each partner
          • usual occupation of each partner
          • relationship status
          • date and location when the civil union was solemnised
          • usual residential address
          • given/first name(s) and surname/family name(s) for each partner’s parent(s)
          • surname/ family name(s) at birth for each partner’s parent(s).
          Document featuresThe civil union record is the registered information pertaining to the civil union contained within the civil union register. A Civil Union Certificate is a printed subset of the record that provides confirmation that a civil union took place in relation to each partner and their parent(s).
          Validity A Civil Union Certificate has no validity period associated with it.
          Issuance processTo initiate the process, one of the parties must first complete a Notice for Intended Civil Union and sign a statutory declaration.

          If the individuals are ‘legally free’ to enter into a civil union, a Civil Union Licence is issued and is valid for three months. During this period the civil union ceremony takes place, and the celebrant returns a copy of the Particulars of Civil Union to the Registrar33 within 10 working days of the ceremony. If the civil union ceremony does not take place during this period, it is recorded that the “Civil union did not take place”.

          Department of Internal Affairs staff enter this data on the civil union register once the union has taken place.

          At the time of the civil union, the parties are given a copy of the Particulars of Civil Union that can be used as an official document to confirm that a civil union took place.

          Once the information is registered, anyone can request any named Civil Union Certificate provided they can provide baseline details that are contained on the record (e.g. names of parties to, and date and place of, the civil union.

          LegislationCivil Unions Act 2005.
          Standard fitThe Civil Union Certificate can be used to prove officially that an individual can use the partner’s surname as her/his own surname. As such, a Civil Union Certificate only provides supporting evidence about name usage.

          Because the identification of applicants is based upon a statutory declaration and anyone is able to request a named Civil Union Certificate, there is a risk with using the Certificate or corresponding data as a primary form of identification.

          Further informationwww.govt.nz/record?recordid=1271
          33 'Registrar' means a person for the time being holding office under section 81(1) of the BDMR Act,; and includes the Registrar-General and every Deputy Registrar-General.

          Next page: Appendix B

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          Last updated: 13/12/2005