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Casino Gaming

Gazetted Casino Game Rules

Certificates of Approval for Casino Employees

Funding For Community Groups

Gaming Licences

Gaming Licence Fees

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Gaming Licences



In New Zealand, gaming activities other than casino gaming and racing are covered by the
Gaming and Lotteries Act 1977 and its subsequent amendments, and require a licence issued to a society: individuals and commercial businesses cannot be licensed. Casino gaming and racing are covered by other laws.

Note: The Gambling Act 2003 repeals the Casino Control Act 1990 and the Gaming and Lotteries Act 1977 and integrates them into a single Act. Racing continues to be administered under the Racing Act 2003 (with some exceptions, such as gaming machine operations in TABs and racing clubs).

  • NEW! Gambling Act Consultation (22/03/04) Consultations are currently being undertaken on the following aspects of the new legislation: Proposed Infringement Offences for Casino Game Rules; Games played on Gaming Machines in Class 4 Venues - Outside Casinos; Limits on Venue Expenses; Game Rules Class 1, 2 and 3 - Lotteries, Instant Games, Games of Chance and Prize Competitions; and Housie Rules (see below).
  • NEW! Housie Rules Consultation March 2004 Housie has been allowed in New Zealand since 1959. It is currently controlled by the Housie Regulations 1989 and by licence conditions. Following the enactment of the Gambling Act 2003, the old Housie Regulations will be repealed and replaced by new Housie Rules, which will take effect from 1 July 2004.
  • Second Discussion Paper on Site Payments 22/12/2003 The Department has been reviewing its policy and licence conditions relating to gaming machine site payments. This page contains two discussion papers on site payments, a draft summary of the submissions received on the first discussion paper, and the Department's interim policy on site payments.

Gaming Machine Operators
Gaming machines that are operated outside casinos are licensed under Section 8 of the Gaming and Lotteries Act 1977. Gaming machines require a licence issued to a society, and a site approval in respect of each site where the operator intends to place machines. The licence application must show an
authorised purpose for which the gaming activity will raise funds, such as distributing funds to community groups to support particular community projects. Any society that fails to comply with the licence requirements may be deemed unsuitable to operate gaming machines in the future.

The latest conditions and Gaming Machine Operations Manual ('The Blue Book') are set out below in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format.

If you do not have Adobe Acrobat Reader, you can download a free version from the Adobe site. A hard copy version of the licence conditions and The Blue Book are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

The Blue Book is accompanied by a series of forms (see Appendices). These are the standard forms that gaming machine licence holders must regularly complete, in order to fulfill the requirements set out in the Operation Manual. The forms are reproduced here separately in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format, with reference to their relevant section in the book.

It is important that your society complies with the requirements set out in the licence conditions. Non-compliance may mean that that your society or site may not be deemed suitable to operate gaming machines in the future. These conditions are effective from 1 October 2002.

About the new gaming machine licence conditions

Set A - Single Site Club

Set A - Licence Conditions 81k

Set A - Guidelines 334k


Set B - Public Premises Single and Multi Site

Set B -Licence Conditions 90k

Set B - Guidelines 400k

The Blue Book - Gaming Machines Operation Manual

Gaming Machine Operations Manual - complete text (without Appendices) 1.8m

The Blue Book - Appendices (forms)

Cash Clearance Details Report (Appendix to s. 2.4) 125k
Cancelled Credits, Shorts pays and Refills Record (Appendix to s. 2.5) 126k
Click here for background information about this new form (above)
Cancelled Credits and Short Pays Record (Appendix to s. 2.6) 114k
Weekly Gaming Machine Profit Return (Appendix to s. 2.7) 130k
Weekly Gaming Machine Profit Return - Summary Sheet (Appendix to s. 2.7) 123k
Monthly Machine Analysis Form - Annotated example (Appendix to s. 2.8) 187k
Monthly Machine Analysis Form (Appendix to s. 2.8) 142k
Daily Jackpot Turnover Record (Appendix to s. 2.9.5) 116k
Daily Jackpot Cancelled Credit Record (Appendix to s. 2.9.6) 123k
Weekly Jackpot System Analysis Form - First and 2 Level (Appendix to s. 2.9.8) 143k
Weekly Jackpot System Analysis Form - 3 Level (Appendix to s. 2.9.8) 150k
Weekly Jackpot System Analysis Form - 4 Level (Appendix to s. 2.9.8) 138k
Cashless Gaming Machine Analysis Report (Appendix to s. 2.10) 134k
Grant Application Form (and information notes) 184k
Authorised Purposes Schedule (Appendix to s. 4) 90k

Equipment Fault, Player Dispute Form 416k


New licence applicants must explain how their society plans to distribute funds, and include a summary of their projected income and expenditure over the next 12 months. Gaming machines and associated equipment must be approved by the Department of Internal Affairs.

A society's gaming machine licence is renewed annually. A financial summary of the previous year's operation must be submitted with the renewal application.

In general, societies are expected to return at least 33% of turnover (minus prizes) to authorised purposes.

A gaming machine site is expected to have a liquor licence to prevent minors from playing machines. The society must have a detailed agreement with the site operator and demonstrate good management of its sites. The site must display a gaming machine site approval.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

More Information
About the new gaming machine licence conditions
View previous gaming machine licence conditions and forms
View Gambits, our newsletter for gaming machine societies and site operators
View Gaming Machine / Expenditure Statistics
View Funding for Community Groups - contact addresses of gaming machine societies that distribute grants to community groups.

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Housie
Detailed regulations govern the conduct of housie, available from the
Gaming Compliance Unit.
  • NEW! Housie Rules Consultation March 2004 Housie has been allowed in New Zealand since 1959. It is currently controlled by the Housie Regulations 1989 and by licence conditions. Following the enactment of the Gambling Act 2003, the old Housie Regulations will be repealed and replaced by new Housie Rules, which will take effect from 1 July 2004.

There are two types of housie licence:
  • Housie Part 1-Up to 1000 cards may be sold per session and 70% must be paid out in prizes from the gross takings of each session.
  • Housie Part 2-Up to 200 cards may be sold per session and 85% must be paid out in prizes from the gross takings per session.
Profits must be returned to the society's authorised purposes.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Lotteries and Raffles
A lottery, or raffle, is a game that is determined by a draw. Draws for licensed lotteries must be carried out under police supervision. Lottery prizes cannot jackpot.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Gaming Sessions (Casino Evenings)
These are evenings when casino games such as roulette and blackjack are played using "funny money". Equipment for the evening is usually hired. The evening ends with a blind auction where prizes are purchased with funny money winnings.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the
Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Prize Competitions
The result of a prize competition is determined by a combination of chance and player knowledge or skill. An example might be a fishing competition requiring the contestants to catch "lucky" numbered fish.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Calcuttas
Calcuttas are a type of prize competition consisting of a sweepstake on a live event such as a race or other sporting contest (eg the Melbourne Cup), combined with an auction. There are detailed rules and conditions governing the running of Calcuttas.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the
Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Parlour Derbies/Filly Stakes
These events involve totalisator-style betting on mock or pre-recorded horse racing events.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the
Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Instant Games
These usually take the form of a scratch ticket or mystery envelope. Games must be licensed when the total prize value is over NZ$50.00. Your application must give details on how the tickets will be printed so the Department can be sure that prizes will be distributed randomly.

Download the forms below. Once the form is downloaded to your computer, you can print it, then complete it using a pen and return the form to us by mail or fax. Forms are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You need to have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. You can download a free version from the
Adobe site. Hard copy versions are available from the Gaming Compliance Unit.

Other Games
If you want to run a type of gaming that isn't covered here, contact the
Gaming Compliance Unit for advice.

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Further information and requirements

Only societies can run licensed gaming activities
Only a society can be licensed to conduct the gaming activities covered by the Act. Individuals and commercial businesses cannot be licensed to conduct gaming activities.

A society is a body established and run entirely for non-commercial purposes. Types of organisations which may be societies include:
  • Boards of Trustees or PTAs
  • charitable trusts
  • chartered clubs
  • church groups
  • amateur sports clubs affiliated to a recognised organisation.
Your initial gaming licence application needs to include a copy of your society's trust deed or other founding document to demonstrate the non-commercial nature and objectives of your group.

Profits must be for authorised purposes only
When your society applies for a licence, you need to describe your proposed fund raising objectives in detail. These must be for "authorised purposes" only. Profits cannot be used for personal or commercial gain.

Authorised purposes are charitable, philanthropic, cultural and party political purposes, and other purposes that are beneficial to the community or a section of it.

Examples of things that could be authorised purposes include:
  • refurbishment of a local marae
  • computers for a school
  • a sports trip for a recognised amateur sports team.

Examples of things that would not be authorised purposes are:
  • funds for a family reunion
  • an overseas trip for yourself
  • the cost of "after match" functions for sporting groups
  • funds to support your business.

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Prohibited prizes
It is illegal to offer the following items as prizes for gaming activities:
  • firearms and ammunition
  • liquor
  • second hand goods
  • land not zoned residential (eg commercial/industrial land)
  • vouchers or entitlements for the above.

Audit controls
Audit requirements vary according to the type of game.

Inspectors of Gaming are entitled:

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Last updated: 22/03/2004